The Film Burning Man doesn’t want you to see

I caught Olivier Bonin’s Dust and Illusions when it premiered in Melbourne, Australia. Great movie, there were about 50 Burners in the audience and everyone seemed to enjoy it. Since then, I’ve been waiting for a broader release of the movie. It is available to rent directly from their web site:

http://dustandillusions.com/

Worth a look – I wouldn’t say it is the whole story of Burning Man, but it’s definitely an inside look at the history of the event that many Burners wouldn’t be aware of.

9 comments on “The Film Burning Man doesn’t want you to see

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  7. I have watched many Burning Man films and Dust & Illusions is truly the only I recommend to watch for it is not just a blind love for the event. Don’t get me wrong I love the event, but we’re humans and our journey is never perfect. It is important that we reflect on that journey and its imperfection including Burning Man. Working for the Man can be fun to watch just after coming back from Burning Man, and talks about one side of Burning Man, but the director is not such a great story-teller. Dust & Illusions is funny, it is a great story, and I learnt a lot from the film actually. Watch them all and judge for yourself. I’d love to hear from other people who have seen the films.

  8. This film and a couple of other “insider looks” owe a debt of gratitude to “Working for the Man”, a doc that came out in the year 2000 that covers not only the history of the event, but the building and disappearance of the city, too.

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