2014 Golden Rebar Awards

Every year, This Is Black Rock City presents the “Golden Rebar Awards” to camps that show innovative architecture. This year, there were some truly spectacular winners. Philippe Glade says:

This year, 2014 (my 18th burn), the streets of BRC were bursting with either small or huge shelters as well as makeshift or well planned camps. It was the year of the connectors, several designers came up with metal, wood or acetate resin nodes, resulting in easy to pack and assemble structures.
 
The city became more than ever a vibrant laboratory for daring creators looking in different directions to solve the equation of a simply built, extremely resistant, not too expensive and easy to haul shelter.
 
Because they are not mentioned on any maps I have to explore relentlessly all the streets of my dusty city in search of the diamond in the rough. 
 
The result of this urban exploration is this blog and these Golden Rebars  that, hopefully, with discernment and a bit of zaniness I award on the merits of creativity, design and architectural breakthrough.
See the full list here.

Some highlights:

Cloud Extruded by Frannie Marchese

Golden Rebar for Creativity
Using cut strips of insulation panels, the same used to build hexayurts,
Frannie spent 5 days preparing her shelter that was setup on the playa in
2 hours.

The ubiquitous markings of the insulation panels were painted over and coded for fast installation

She even had a marine toilet connected to a grey water tank.

 

The Playa Painted Lady

Golden Rebar for Whimsicality

Three story high with a top deck, this house could easily be found in pre-war Vienna, Europe.

 

The Pallet Palace

Golden Rebar for Repurposing

A frame of recycled 2×4 held the walls made of used pallets
Other use of pallets

Red Lightning Camp

Golden Rebar for Best Camp Design

This superb camp was designed and built by GuildWorks, founded by Mar C. Ricketts, who by serendipity was featured in my book (now sold-out) with his poetic installation Flight of the Future Seed in 2006.
This architect of the air also designed last year golden rebar winner for best camp design Sacred Spaces Village.

Check out the rest at thisisblackrockcity

Temples, Temples, Everywhere…

Inhabitat is one of my favorite Internet sites. They’ve just featured Burning Man – specifically, the Hayam Sun Temple designed by British architecture student Josh Haywood. This might give David Best’s Temple of Grace a run for it’s money this year.

London-based designer and University of Westminster architecture student Josh Haywood has designed the Hayam Sun Temple, a stunning temporary pavilion built from lasercut plywood for Burning Man 2014. The annual festival, which attracts some of the most creative and diverse minds from around the world to Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, awarded the Moorish-inspired filigree design with the Burning Man Art Grant. Haywood and his fellow architecture and design classmates have also taken to Kickstarter to crowd fund the project’s construction and transportation costs.

As a temple to the sun, the pavilion forgoes the trim of precious metals and enamels characteristic of Moorish design and relies instead on the sunrays that will filter through the delicate screen and bathe the temple in a golden halo.

Inspired by tessellated Moorish architecture, the temporary art installation is pierced through with intricate geometric cutouts that filter the sun’s rays and cast dramatic shadows onto the desert floor.

At night, the Hayam will be illuminated from within like a giant lantern.

Built with plywood laser cut into the intricate patterns of Islamic geometry, each perforated piece will be seamlessly joined together into a curvilinear structure that rests atop four pillars.

Read more: Hayam Temple by Josh Haywood « Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

You can support the project here.

Check out these stunning images from Inhabitat:

Hayam-Temple-by-Josh-Haywood-3
Hayam-Temple-by-Josh-Haywood-1 Hayam-Temple-by-Josh-Haywood-5 Hayam-Temple-by-Josh-Haywood-6 Hayam-Temple-by-Josh-Haywood-7 Hayam-Temple-by-Josh-Haywood Hayam-Temple-by-Josh-Haywood-4

 

From the project’s Kickstarter page:

We are a group of designers and architecture students from London. Our aim is to produce joyful and spiritual architecture using digital design and fabrication. 

In this time of world conflict we believe nothing is more important than the bringing together of people as exemplified by the Burning Man community. The Hayam Sun Temple is our contribution to this quest for peace and harmony.

The word ‘Hayam’ is one of many Arabic words for love, specifically passionate love, and this is a project that has been built on passion and love. I believe that all the important things in life should be carried out with passion, whether that be loving, designing, making, or building.

This tessellated temple is the result of a year-long study, exploring the mystique and magic of Moorish architecture and researching the refined geometry and pattern of the Alhambra and the Alcazars. Geometry is the language of the universe and speaks to us all equally. I have experimented with the digitalisation of these geometries in parametric models to generate new and exciting architectural forms.

The Hayam is a temple to sunlight, open to the sky, filtering the sun’s rays through the intricately pierced plywood panels, and throwing dazzling patterns of light in every direction. At night the four pillars are illuminated from within like a giant lantern.

The pavilion references motifs and arabesques traditionally found in Moorish architecture but in itself the Hayam has ties to no religion; it provides a shared spiritual and sensual experience that transcends language and culture. The theme of the festival this year is ‘Caravanserai’, and our pavilion shares in all the connotations of that word: travel to exotic parts, adventure and exploration, fusion of cultures, crossing of borders, rest and shelter for weary travellers before they continue on their journey.

Scale laser cut test model of one quarter of the temple

“If you invest in beauty, it will remain with you all the days of your life”. Frank Lloyd Wright

 

Golden Rebar Awards

Philippe Glade is the author of old-fashioned paper bookBlack Rock City, NV – the Ephemeral Architecture of Burning Man“.

On his site, thisisblackrockcity.blogspot.com , he hands out “Golden Rebar” awards to the best structures at Burning Man. 2013 features some real doozies, incuding an igloo literally made of bread.

We’ve picked our favorite three. See the complete list of 2013 winners here at Philippe’s site

Golden Rebar Grand Prize: Metal Pods Village by Scott Parenteau
When last year Scott “Tin Man” Parenteau came for the first time to Burning Man, he became an instant celebrity on the playa with his walking pod that since brought him several awards at Maker Faire, and with his two patented metal pods used for shelter was a big draw for his neighbors.
 
For his second time at Black Rock City, Scott upped the ante and decided to build a village for his friends. He was able to finish his own shelter by adding the third pod, the bedroom on top of a fully operational stainless steel custom made shower and a complete kitchen. 
 

A bedroom with a view and bamboo flooring.

Golden Rebar for Only In Black Rock City and We Want to Keep it this Way: The Dome of Dough
This Shelter was entirely made of 850 Loaves of Bread with an insulation value of  R-5 and lasted the week.
Do we witness the start of a new building trend at Black Rock?
On the blackboard were some possible names: Rye Not? Flour Power, Dill Dough, Make loaves not War… 

 

Golden Rebar for BRC Landmark: The Chiton by D’Milo Hallerberg.
Shelter and community space made of steel tubing and nylon cloth, the Chiton blurs the lines between
architectural concept and art installation, a feat few architects in the default world are capable of. It measures 21 feet high, 22 feet wide and 45 feet long.
 

 

It’s great to see the experimental architecture of Burning Man being celebrated and highlighted like this, and we appreciate Phillipe’s efforts. He must be favored by the BMOrg, since he is allowed to use their trademarked term “Black Rock City” to promote his book.