Burners.Me Radio On The Air

musical truth

Well, here’s something to listen to anyway. Probably doesn’t “rhyme with Burning Man” in quite the same way as the (now silent) official Burning Man radio station BMIR, but perhaps you could say it “rhymes about Burning Man”.

Jan Irvin and I just did a “50 Years of Flower Power” interview with UK-based DJ Mark Devlin, who has been exposing the darker side of the music industry.

Slick editing Mark, thanks for the opportunity. Love your work!


From Gnostic Media:

 

GVP #111 – Jan Irvin & Steve Outtrim – MK-Ultra & The Counter-Culture – interview by Mark Devlin

Returning guest Jan Irvin of Gnostic Media is joined by New Zealand IT specialist-turned independent researcher Steve Outtrim, as we reflect on the legacy of 1967’s ‘Summer of Love’ – in many ways the zenith of the 1960s counter-culture scene.

As Jan and Steve’s work has shown, the entire movement appears to have been the creation of the intelligence community, specifically the CIA working under the direction of Britain’s MI6, and it stands as a 101 masterclass in how culture-changing social-engineering gets done.

We retrace many of the events and personnel that played a key role in the culture shift, including the Macy Conferences, cybernetics, Aldous Huxley, Gordon Wasson, The Esalen Institute, SRI, Berkeley, Owlsley Stanley, Stewart Brand, Ken Kesey, Allen Ginsberg, San Francisco’s Human Be-In and the Monterey Pop Festival. The influential roles of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones are discussed, along with that of the ‘acid guru’ Dr. Timothy Leary, who later confessed to having been an asset of the CIA.

We consider the templates that are so often employed by the social-engineers, including the Hegelian Dialectic and the creation of false heroes and role models, in the hope that the public can fully understand the ways in which we’re continually being played, as the first step towards not getting fooled again.

The interview is interspersed with original music and speech audio to help bring the story alive.


Download our entire Shadow History of Burners series, something to watch or listen to when you’re waiting in line for 9 hours for a False Amber Alert or because the city is at MaxPop or Closed (like in 2014)

 

We did this one on the 50th anniverary of the Human Be-In, January 14 2017:

How To Deal With Cops At Burning Man: 2017

A guest post from Mark Atwood


How to deal with cops at Burning Man (2017 update)

by Mark Atwood

(Feel free to print out, share, and repost. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. I am not a lawyer. This document is not legal advice. If you are ticketed, cited, or arrested, consult with an attorney. )

* Do not consent to a search.

Never consent to a search. Say the phrase “I do not consent to a search.”

The cops are trained to make you flustered and to “take command” of the situation. Or they can be “polite”: “Mind if we take a look around?” Yes, you mind. “I do not consent to a search.”

Even if you have nothing for them to find, always say “I do not consent to a search.”

Never consent to a search of your body, of your clothing, of your possessions, of your car, of your truck, of your trailer, of your RV, of your tent, or of your camp. You especially never consent to the search of anyone else’s property.

They can ask the other people in your group or in your car, not just the driver or leader. “Mind if we take a look?” You should all sing the same song: “I do not consent to a search.”

Even if they threaten you with arrest or if threaten to bring a sniffing dog, continue to say “I do not consent to a search”. Even while they are searching you or your stuff, continue to say it. “I do not consent to a search”.

* Being Questioned.

Cops can ask you questions.

They may say things like “We’re just talking”, or “What do you think of …?”, or “Can you help us out?”

You do not have to answer their questions, and probably shouldn’t.

They can ask you where your camp is, and who you are camping with. You don’t have to answer them, and you probably shouldn’t.

* Recreational drugs.

Never answer any questions about recreational drugs.

Remember, you never take drugs, you never carry drugs, you never supply drugs, you have no idea where to get drugs, you do not want any drugs, and you do not know anyone who does is the basics in learning how to deal with cops and how to get a job.

That includes cannabis in any form, in any amount. Cannabis is still not legal on BLM land, even for medical use. Having a medical card from any state is not a defense. The new Nevada personal use possession law is not a defense.

If you have a legal prescription to a Schedule II drug such as Adderall, Ritalin, OxyContin, and/or Methadone, keep your pills in their correct prescription bottle and locked somewhere safe. You can be charged if you cannot prove you have a legal prescription.

* Do not lead them to your camp.

They may try to make you lead them to your camp.

They can be very commanding and matter of fact about it. They may say “We are going to your camp.” They will make it sound as if you have no choice. You do have a choice, and you are going to chose to not to lead them to your camp. Never lead them to your camp.

If they really really insist on you leading them somewhere, then lead them to a Black Rock Ranger outpost.

* Keep your tent closed.

Always zip your tent closed when you are not in it. If possible, use screens or sheets to block transparent window screens, so there is no line of sight into your tent. You may want to use a luggage lock to lock the zipper of your tent when you are not in it.

If your tent is zipped shut, they are supposed to need a warrant to open it, or they are supposed to need your consent. They probably won’t have a warrant, and you are not going to give them your consent, remember? “I do not consent to a search.”

* Your name and your ID.

If they ever stop you, you do have to tell them your correct “wallet name” as it is printed on your official ID. Cops are uninterested in arguments about “dead names”. Tell them your name as it is printed on your official ID, driver’s license, or passport. You do not have to show them your ID if they ask to see it. You especially do not have to go to your camp to get your ID for them.

If you are a not a US citizen and are visiting on a visa waiver program, you do not have to carry your passport with you. If you are a resident alien on a visa (e.g. you have a “green card”), you do have to carry your green card with you. Sorry about that.

* Being Detained, or “Am I free to go?”.

The magic phrase is: “Am I free to go?”

Keep saying it. As soon as they say “yes”, walk away immediately and without another word. Do not run, just walk.

If they write you a ticket, you must take it. Put it in your pocket, and then you say “Am I free to go?”

If they ever say you are not free to go, you say “Am I being arrested?”. If they say “no you are not being arrested”, you say again “Am I free to go?”. Keep it up as many times as necessary. Yes, it will sound like a stupid kid game, like “stop copying me”, but the game is very real with very real stakes, and this is their game to win, and yours to lose.

* Being Arrested.

If they ever say anything like “you are under arrest”, or ever do anything to make you think you are being arrested, such as them restraining you in any way, you must immediately say the following magic phrase (memorize it!): “I do not consent to any search. I hereby invoke my right to remain silent. I want to speak to my attorney.” And then you SHUT THE FUCK UP.

Do not say anything at all about your arrest or why you may have been arrested until you are talking in private with your attorney. Not with those cops, not with any other cops, not with any onlookers, not with anyone else who was arrested, not with anyone who is being held with you. Not even with your campmates, or with your friends, or even with your family. Even your spouse. Assume the police cars, transport vans, and holding cells are bugged. Assume the cops will lie about what you say to them. Assume everyone you meet from when you are arrested to when you are released will testify against you and will lie about what you say to them. You invoked your right to remain silent. Now use it.

* Alcohol.

The camps with open bars that are giving away booze may ask to see your ID to verify you are older than 21. You don’t have to show it to them, but they don’t have to give you free booze either, and they probably won’t, fearing a bust.

The state liquor cops will be there trying to bust your camp with stings. If you are giving away booze, even if it’s only beer or wine, and the person you are about to give it to looks like they could possibly be under 21, you should verify their age by checking their ID.

Even if your camp is not running a public bar, random people will walk into your camp and ask for booze. You will almost certainly have an under-21 plainclothes liquor cop walk into your camp at least once during the week, trying to sting you. Be aware, an alcohol service bust is an expensive way to ruin your burn for your entire camp.

And even if the person asking for a free drink is not a cop, it’s rude and against the burner ethos to beg for a gift.

* Who Watches the Watchmen?

While the cops are dealing with you, you need to be memorizing the color and design of their uniforms, and if you can, memorizing their name tags. They are supposed to be wearing visible name tags while in uniform. Yeah, right.

As soon as you get away from the cops, go to Center Camp, or to a Black Rock Ranger outpost, and fill out a Law Enforcement Feedback Form and turn it in.

If you personally with your own eyes see the cops detaining anyone, arresting anyone, or searching anyone or anything, it is an act of Civic Responsibility (Principle 7) and a Gift (Principle 2) to Participate (Principle 9) in the burner community to memorize what you can, and then fill out and turn in a Law Enforcement Feedback Form as soon as you can.

* Your camera.

When you see the cops, you may choose to use your camera to record them. The judiciary at all levels has clearly stated that everyone, including you, has the right to record the police, as long as you don’t physically obstruct them. Cops hate it, but too bad.

If the cops tell you to turn off your camera, don’t do it. If they threaten to arrest you for recording, keep recording.

They cannot lawfully order you to stop recording. They cannot lawfully order you or anyone else to delete photos or video. They cannot lawfully delete any photos or video themselves. If they do, they themselves are knowingly breaking the law, and that will be very useful in court.

If you ever see a cop order anyone to stop recording or to delete anything, make sure that goes on the Law Enforcement Feedback Form.

While you are recording them, never get in their way, and stay back at least 35 feet / 10 meters.

* “Undercover” cops.

The cops claim there are “very few” “undercover” cops at the event. This is a very carefully nuanced untruth.

There are cops at the event who are not “undercover” but instead are “plain clothes”. This means that instead of wearing uniforms or visible badges they are instead dressed up to look like burners.

They do not have to tell you they are cops when you ask them. You will not be able to “sense” that they are cops. Some of them have been doing this every year for more years than you have come to the event yourself.

People have been busted by a cop who was wearing only sparkles and a miniskirt.

If someone you do not know asks for drugs or offers to trade you anything for drugs, they are a cop. If you met them this year at this Burn, you do not know them.

If you met these two girls a few days ago looking at art out in deep playa, and they are really cute, and they went out dancing with you last night, and they just suggested that if you can supply some “favors”, you all can “party together” in your tent, they are cops. No, really, yes, she and her girlfriend both are cops, and her coworkers are eagerly standing by to ruin your whole year.

* What if I need “Police Services”?

What if you are lost? Or a camp mate is lost? Or your child is lost? Or you have found a lost child? Or you have found a someone who is injured or who is unable to take care of themselves? What if you are assaulted? What if something has been stolen? What if someone is hurt? What if you are really too high? What if you find someone who is dangerously out of sorts? What if you just can’t even?

Go to a BLACK ROCK RANGER or to an ESD VOLUNTEER. The Rangers or ESD will help deal with the situation, and if the cops are actually needed, the Rangers or ESD can summon the cops and can deal with the cops. If the cops are not needed, then the Rangers or ESD can summon the right help for you.

Know what the Black Rock Ranger uniform is, and how it’s different from the cop uniforms. Rangers wear khaki shirts and khaki hats with the Burning Man logo on their hats, and on their chests, and on their backs, and on their vehicles. ESD have yellow shirts that say “Emergency Services” on them.

Have a great Burn!

To Burn, Or Not To Burn? Who Decides The Question?

 

Some high drama going down in the British Columbia Burning Man Community, again.

They just had their BITF (Burn In The Forest) party, in the middle of a state-wide total fire ban and a State of Emergency where 45,000 people have been displaced from their homes by wild fires in the last few days.

Organizer Krystal says (I’m paraphrasing) “there is a total fire ban every year, the fire chief and local tribe chief both approved our burn, so this is a non-issue”

Long time community member Jackson Smith points out that in past years, they had decided not to burn due to community sensitivities, and had discussed the issue as a community. This year the process appears to have changed, with some hints that a move to the local indigenous reservation may be making it easier to burn.

When do local sensitivities matter? I would think “all the time”, but sadly Burners leave trash and cause problems in many local towns. The “Leave no trace” rule at the Black Rock City event leads to overflowing trash bins in Reno.

Are the Ten Principles just marketing, something to pay lip service to as the corporations sell the tickets and bank the cash? There’s nothing in them about helping communities around the Temporary Autonomous Zone, anyway.

Here is the essence of the question raised. Are we there for ourselves, or are we there to spread Burner culture to the local community?

Screenshot 2017-07-20 18.32.31

Great question. Are the Ten Principles only for the event, or does it matter how Burners interact with the Default world? Is the point of all this hedonism, or making the world a better place?

burn bc burn2017keremeos2017 dont burn

burn ban notice

vancouver fire ban.jpg

These fires are no joke. Many people have lost their whole community. The Premier of British Columbia declared a State of Emergency, 155 fires are still raging, and 45,000 people have been displaced from their homes. Even Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had to take time out from his busy schedule of globalist bootlicking to Tweet about it:

Still, Safety Third, right? Sucks for them, but what you gonna do? There’s fun to be had, and occult rituals to be done. Party up!

This is the official statement on the BITF situation from the event organizer.

Screenshot 2017-07-20 18.38.08Screenshot 2017-07-20 18.38.19

Sounds reasonable, right? They consulted with local authorities, the fire chief and the tribe chief said “burn”, so they burned. What’s the problem?

Well, I wasn’t there speaking to the local community about their feelings. We have to rely on multiple accounts from concerned Burners – all of which, of course, were dismissed by the organizers who are trying to bring any questioning offline. Did they learn that in spin class at Esalen or the GLC?

Here are some highlights from the Facebook discussion, I’ll spare you the endless back and forth. Simon Saxomasaurus appears to be the decision-maker. His reasoning for being insensitive to the local disaster and for wanting to stop public discussion and only answer questions by private message? “I’m just a big meanie”. Ok then. There’s nothing in the Ten Principles about Big Meanies, other than that “Radical Inclusion” means you have to let serial killers and child molesters in just as much as Kardashians and Jersey Shore frat bros.

Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.35.51Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.54.20Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.37.06Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.37.59Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.38.32Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.40.45Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.42.03Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.43.41Screenshot 2017-07-20 17.47.45

Read the rest of the discussion at the BC Burning Man Community Facebook Group.

I’ll let the lead fire performer safety tech have the last word:

Screenshot 2017-07-21 08.24.34

5 Tips For Surviving Your First Burning Man Experience

A guest post by Adrian Stefirta

Screenshot 2017-05-31 12.13.42

Note: All images used in this article are copyright-free

5 Tips For Surviving Your First Burning Man Experience

Your first Burning Man should be a liberating experience. And by “liberating” I suppose it should be as far away from the outer world as it can safely be. There should be no Facebook feeds, retweets and all that meaningless stuff.

People claim that the Burning Man that is well prepared for is a spiritual experience like no other. That’s no mystery, I guess. Leaving your annoying nine-to-five job to interact with random people, far away from civilization, sometimes doing drugs you’ve never heard of can easily be one of the most thrilling experiences you’ve engaged in so far. Speaking of drugs…

Screenshot 2017-05-31 12.13.52

1. Make Sure You Get Tickets Early

Ever hear the saying “The early bird gets the worm”? Well, the early bird gets to go to Burning Man as well!

Before we even get to the tips for when you arrive at the event, let’s first cover the fact that you should get tickets early. This is not something you’ll want to wait last minute for.

Burners.me wrote back in 2015 about 14 Tips For Getting Burning Man Tickets. The advice is still good to this day.

 

2. Get in the zone

The festival is famous for the community. You’ll definitely encounter the most bizarre people that have lots amazing stories and experiences to share, and it would be a shame not to get out in the world and sink in the energy surrounding you.

Leave your camera, don’t worry about your friends’ gastronomic preferences in your social media feed, and forget about your outfit. Nobody cares, neither should you. As an EDM fan, you might imagine that a festival is a place you easily get the vibe.

 

3. Self-reliance is crucial

Moreover, you could even say that self-reliance is in the spirit of the event. You must be ready for nearly everything that could go wrong and the more precaution you apply to your preparations, the smoother the experience.

You’ll need a huge amount of things starting with a flashlight and a pack of zip lockers to lip balm and a bicycle. There are so many things you’ll need, you’re guaranteed to forget something.

As mentioned above, leave your designer clothes at home and only bring clothing that is useful, warm (it can get chilly at night), and durable. You’re going to be exposed to numerous hours of sun, sand, and wind, which will be very demanding of your body and your clothing. Bear in mind that you’ll probably eat quite an amount of sand in the process, so why not bring a mask that you can wear when the wind is strong.

You see, people who haven’t taken proper care of their provisions have a special name they’re called on the Playa – Sparkling Ponies. You don’t want to be one.

 

4. Bring gifts

The sky’s the limit, but why not grab some practical things in a light excess? If you still have some spare space in your car, don’t hesitate to grab some snacks, water bottles, and other things that people around you could find useful. However, do not misunderstand the essential idea around gifts. You shouldn’t rely on people swapping their resources on yours because they’ve probably messed up and forgot to bring a bunch of important stuff, just like you did.

Gifts are about offering and not about trading, so don’t be offended if you give someone your grandfather’s watch and all you get is a free hug. Do not forget about the emotional and spiritual imperative of the event.

Screenshot 2017-05-31 12.14.00

5. Sleep

This is your first Burning Man experience. It’s one of a kind, and none will be same. You’re stoked and you’re freaking out. Regardless of that, you need to sleep. This may sound like a bizarre thing to say, yet there are so many amazing things happening on the Playa every single hour, that you’ll probably feel like a fool if you missed any of those. But this is another thing you’ll have to let go of.

Let your body rest a reasonable amount of time. You’re permanently exposed to sun, wind, sand, loud music, random people, alcohol, and crazy experiences. Let your brain rest. This is not a marathon you need to win, this is supposed to be an inspiring and spiritual experience. Remember?

Some people simply sleep throughout daylight and rave all night, which isn’t necessarily the best pattern to experience what the Burning Man has got to offer.

 

Final Notes

As an EDM fan, it is crucial that you perceive the Burning Man as a concept in its entirety. You could say that the festival isn’t about electronic music or karaoke but still many people go just because they have the best karaoke machines from the Music Critic’s guide to karaoke machines, as much as it is about the counterculture and its fringes. Well, you may claim that, given its background.

In the mid-nineties, Burning Man featured the Techno scene that was continuously emerging from the ghetto as its central musical figure. Nowadays, Techno is still in the underground of contemporary culture, yet, you can easily spot artists like Calvin Harris and others in the festival’s line-ups.

Is Calvin Harris about counterculture? I can hardly imagine. So what you need to know is the following – the festival does not focus on music as much as it focuses on the spiritual experience. Depending on your musical preferences, you may or may not want to choose other places to visit.

In my humble perspective, as a very opinionated appreciator of underground electronic music, there is nothing that mainstream artists like the above-mentioned can bring to my table, in terms of spirituality. But it’s your call to be made, so choose wisely before you decide to visit the Playa, expecting it would even remotely resemble a club in Ibiza.

 Screenshot 2017-05-31 12.14.10 The Author:

Adrian Stefirta is an EDM producer & writer for MIDI Lifestyle. He’s also an aficionado of Techno and a resident at Waxtefacts Records.