Org Envisions The Future With “Visioning Teams”

Popular art installation The Pier is now at Fly Ranch.
Image: Friends of the Black Rock Desert

Has Burning Man become rudderless without the leadership of founder Larry Harvey, who passed away earlier this year? Now that they have a $45 million budget, and a permanent year-round site gifted to them to the tune of about $7 million, are they finally able to…DO something?

Well…YMMV. Perhaps in this Brave New World of Millenials, the better part of a year spent Ideating qualifies as something profound and meaningful, an enormous and courageous action communally performed by all who participate.

The lead post up at the BJ calls for “ideas” from the community to be added to the ideas that they come up with themselves after months of elite visioning, perhaps at Esalen or Flysalen, using the powers of Holacracy and Timothy Leary

[Source]

A group specifically charged with coming up with a vision! How exciting.

Meanwhile in the comment section, Burners be like: close the airport. Stop selling out our culture. Charge camps for prime placement instead of allocating it through favoritism. Focus on ways to reduce the environmental footprint and waste generated. Stop making it hard for true Burners to participate while encouraging an influx of sparkle pony tourists. Don’t make us wait in line. Make it easier to get tickets.

Sadly, the same things I’ve been hearing – and saying – for many years. BMorg is BMorg, we’ll see what happens…#ComingSoon.

They expect to spend at least a year on this intensive “visioning” process. Partying it up in the solar-powered Russian steam baths at Fly Ranch is no doubt on the agenda.

Burners can donate cool stuff to the ranch like Russian steam baths and solar arrays. Image: burningman.org

Sign up for a workshop, get naked and tell us all your ideas! Even if you can’t make it to Flysalen, Burners anywhere are invited to spend their time contributing to the visioning.

Here’s how to participate:

Fill out this survey. It will take around 30 minutes to complete. We’ll ask you about city planning, camp size and culture, money and decommodification within camps, and more. If you’ve ever lived in Black Rock City, please fill out the survey. The survey deadline is Thursday November 8 at 11:59 pm PST.

Participate in a community conversation in your area. We’ve partnered with camps and regional communities all over the world to host deeper discussions around these topics and to share notes with the visioning group as qualitative data. These are all happening now until the end of November! Check out the listings by location and thank you to everyone hosting!

Host a community conversation. You can organize your own conversation, using a kit we’ve created that includes suggested discussion format, facilitator tips & tricks, questions to ask, and how to submit the input and feedback to the visioning group. Email us at brcculturaldirectionsetting@burningman.org to request the kit. Schedule a date, time, and location (in person or virtual) and, if you’d like, we’ll add it to the listing above so others can join you. You can also host a conversation with just your camp.

Join the Facebook group. Post the notes from your community conversation in this public Facebook group so others can see all the threads as they develop. Post your individual thoughts after taking the survey in the group or as a comment on this Burning Man Journal post.

Share the survey. Share this post and the survey link widely with your fellow Burners, campmates, and friends. We want to hear from folks who are already tuned in (like you reading this) and from folks who are less tuned in, or perhaps haven’t been to Black Rock City in a while.

Stay tuned. We have some ideas for future virtual engagement, and participation opportunities at events like the 2019 Theme Camp Symposium.

This is community-wide engagement. That means this vision won’t reflect any one individual’s feedback. The visioning group will analyze the input gathered, keep you informed, and provide feedback on how our community’s input influences the eventual vision of this project. This visioning group will meet regularly through spring 2019, and we’re excited to see how this effort evolves.

With the 10 Principles in mind and our best intentions as heart, we’re confident we can set a clear path for Black Rock City’s future.

[Source]

Of course there’s a survey. Detailed profiling of all participants is a big part of Burning Man’s raison d’etre. You may want to make sure your VPN is turned on before you check it out.

I have highlighted some of the comments in response to the original post. I put JV’s first because he’s a regular here, and as in most cases I agree with him. Read them all for yourself here

 

Here’s an idea for you, BMorg. Throw Full Moon parties at Fly Ranch. Invite specific camps to come to each one, encourage mixing between the camps on a smaller scale than Black Rock City. Everyone gets to know each other like in the good old days (or Juplaya). Ask each camp to leave a permanent art contribution to the ranch. Offer art car storage with mechanical/electronic/paint services. Get all the art cars there, art cars bring crews who can bring crowds – or not, depending on what is needed to advance the cause. After a couple of years, you will have a enough energy there for a year-round community to thrive. Sell tickets to everyone to fund it. I mean, not that nature walks aren’t swell, but you can still offer that. We’re Burners, we don’t go all the way out there just for nature walks. Party in the hot springs? Now you’re talking…

Here’s a bonus one: spend some of that massive cash surplus you’re sitting on to purchase some trash compactors. We need to have recycling and waste management on the site, it’s not fair to the local community or environment that they should pay the price for Burner waste.

 

CryptoBeast #15 – Mana the Man of Mystery, Part 1 – with Special Guests Carl Hassell and Joe Atwill

“Mana” aka Immanuel Trujillo, founder of the Peyote Way Church of God, is a fascinating and colorful counter-culture character. Carl Hassell knew him personally and has extensively researched his background and activities. In the first of a multi-part series, he reveals Mana’s LARPing as a fascist and disseminating anti-Semitic material on behalf of the ADL.

Joe Atwill: postflaviana.org

 

 

At Least 2000+ SHIFTPODs at Burning Man in 2018

Congratulations to Advanced Shelter Systems and SHIFT Camp, whose Burning Man-inspired invention has been featured by us before:

SHIFTPODs – the new generation of Burnitecture

Where did the SHIFTPOD come from?

They were mentioned in an earlier Burning Man-related story in Fast Company. The author Daniel Terdiman followed up this year by taking one of the newer air-conditioned models out to the Playa.

From Fast Company:

The ShiftPod was originally created as an answer to things like the hexayurt. Longtime Burning Man attendee Christian Weber came up with the idea for something that could be set up quickly, that could withstand heavy winds, and that was big enough to stand up in. He definitely succeeded.

I love my first-gen ShiftPod, but I have to say, the second-gen version is a step up. It’s a bit bigger–enough to notice, for sure–it’s more reflective, which means it’s cooler inside during the hottest part of the morning, and it’s just a little more modern. It feels like a second-gen version. As well, it comes standard with what’s called a Blast Shield, a highly reflective cover meant to make it possible to sleep a little later in the morning, even when there’s no shade.

[Photo: courtesy of the author Daniel Terdiman]

The consensus in my camp, where, amazingly, there were seven ShiftPods this year, was that the Blast Shield probably made it as much as 10 degrees cooler inside than without it. Given that the ShiftPod 2’s higher-reflectivity alone probably cuts 10 degrees over a first-gen version, you’re looking at up to 20 degrees less searing heat by moving from a coverless ShiftPod 1 to a v2 with a Blast Shield. That’s big.

Read the full article at Fast Company.

 

2018 Crime Scorecard: 43 Arrests

The Reno Gazette-Journal reports crime was about the same as last year (according to the Sheriff), or 26% less (according to the math). There were 2 arrests for domestic battery and 2 DUIs.

Sheriff Allen’s arrests at the event don’t include the unprecedented crackdown in tribal territory in the days leading up to the event.

Pershing County Sheriff Jerry Allen said the 43 arrests at Burning Man this year is on par with previous years.

Allen said arrests will continue despite the official end of event on Monday.  Last year, the Pershing County Sheriff’s Office arrested 58 people at Burning Man. Most were on charges of drug possession and trafficking of drugs…The majority of the arrests so far this year are also for drug possession and trafficking.

Of the 43, the sheriff’s office arrested two people for driving while under the influence at Burning Man and two for domestic battery. He said several involved obstruction of a public officer.

“People are still leaving the playa and recovering from a week of partying,” Allen said about the likelihood of more arrests into the coming week. “They are trying to orient themselves and coming to terms with reality.”

[Source: RGJ.com]

Jumping in the pool at the Grand Sierra is a great way to reorient and come to terms with reality.