San Francisco Parties Into The Next Weekend

opulent temple 2014

Burning Man’s official Decompression is not until October 12, but for those who still have the beats of the Playa ringing in their ears and wish they were back there, there’s plenty of good stuff going on this weekend in San Francisco. Playawear is encouraged.

Got another Burner gig? Post it in the Comments.


 

Friday

Opulent Temple are off the Playa and straight back into it, bringing Stanton Warriors to Public Works this Friday night.

Friday, September 5th

Opulent Temple & Public Works presents ‘Dust Off’

While the playa glow is still fresh and because we’re gluttons for punishment, before we’ve even unpacked we’re getting back together to swap stories and smiles at Public Works with the kings of jack!

THE STANTON WARRIORS (stantonwarriors.com / UK)
+
SYD GRIS (Opulent Temple / Opel)
MATT KRAMER (Distrikt)
BILLY SEAL (Opulent Temple)
ELiKi (Opulent Temple)
TAMO (Space Cowboys / Angels of Bass) Vs
VIAJAY (Angels of Bass)
DJ DANE (Dusty Rhino)

& more TBA

Visuals by FulMelt

A 100% benefit to help OT get out of what is looking like some inevitable debt from this year’s (soon to be) epic camp.

Presale tickets available now HERE:
http://www.ticketfly.com/event/636547-stanton-warriors-uk-san-francisco/

If we get enough pre-sale we’ll look at adding a silent disco outside so commit early 😛

9:30pm-3:00am+,
Both floors of Public Works.
161 Erie St @ Mission.
21+

Dress funky!

Both the boyz are in town for this one (and neither are at Burning Man), and we’ll have OT residents and playa staples joining us to dust it up some more! Save some mojo, this party has always kinda totally rocked.

www.opulenttemple.org


Saturday

Space Cowboys will be rocking it at Monarch.

A Space Cowboy knows that reentry is always harder than takeoff. It’s all the work in reverse but minus the energy and enthusiasm. So coast into home with us at our Space Port of choice: Monarch. We’ll shake off the last of the dust and help spin new memories into epic legends as our DJs do their best to piece it all back together. You can wash those costumes next weekend, you won’t need um till Decom anyway.

8Ball
ShOOey
DJ Deckard
Kapt’n Kirk
Tamo
Special Guest tba


On Saturday September 6th, Mighty presents “DUST-BUSTER #6”, a Post-Playa bash featuring some of the most talented DJs representing Burning Man’s top sound camps. Open bar 9-10!

Syd Gris (Opulent Temple)
Anthony Mansfield (Disco Knights)
Ben Seagren DISTRIKT)
Josh Vincent (Heart Phoenix)
Alvaro Bravo (Dusty Rhino)
Derek Hena Pink Mammoth)

Photos and videos from this year’s Burning Man will be projected on the Mighty screens throughout the night, so if you had FOMO from not making it to the Playa, or want to relive the experience, come on in! Playawear encouraged, the dustier the better! Otherwise just come as you are.


 

STANTON WARRIORS (UK)

Stanton Warriors (UK)

Since bursting onto the scene with their multi award-winning compilation “The Stanton Sessions” back in 2001, the Stanton Warriors’ irresistible and inimitable sound has consistently remained the soundtrack to some of the world’s biggest and best parties over the past thirteen years; from East London warehouses, Miami boat parties and illegal Detroit raves, to the stages of Glastonbury, Exit, Burning Man, Ultra and Coachella, selling out global tours and topping DJ lists along the way.

In the studio, Bristol’s Mark Yardley and Dominic Butler have honed a trademark, uncategorisable sound that is at once all their own, but also utterly indefinable, leading to high-profile releases on XL Records, Fabric, Cheap Thrills, Central Station and Universal, alongside official remixes for everyone from Daft Punk and Fatboy Slim, to MIA and Gorillaz. This phenomenal output and remarkable longevity has ensured the Stanton Warriors legendary status amongst not only their fans, but also their peers, as they remain fresh, original and relevant; obstinately dancing to beat of their own drum and helping to pave the way for new talent.

In 2013 alone, the Stanton Warriors topped the Beatport charts (again), inspired Disclosure’s Grammy-nominated album Settle, got Annie Mac dancing on her living room carpet, opened London’s 3k capacity Building Six club, saw their podcast shoot to No. 3 in the iTunes chart and smashed the stages of Coachella, Ultra and Glastonbury.

In 2014, the Stanton Warriors typically show no sign of slowing down, with sold-out Stanton Sessions tours across the USA and UK, collaborations with Claude Von Stroke’s Dirtybird-signed Cause & Affect, a re-release of their smash Bring Me Down, main stage slots at London’s SW4 and Miami’s Ultra festivals and a slew of exciting releases on their own tastemaker label Punks.

“Stanton Warriors’ Bring Me Down is pretty much the perfect garage beat. Everything about that song – the vocal line, the chords, the melody – is totally original.” DISCLOSURE

“Oh my Gosh, SO good! This is the kind of music that makes you literally want to go mental on the nearest dancefloor. As tried and tested on my living room carpet!” ANNIE MAC, BBC RADIO 1

“Stanton Warriors make bass music; intentionally vague, un-pigeonholeable, brilliant bass music.” NOISEY, VICE

“Their relevance and influence has grown with every year and their Stanton Sessions parties simply reaffirm their position atop the pedestal.” MTV

“Stanton Warriors always deliver, this latest track just takes it to a whole other level.” ZANE LOWE, BBC RADIO 1

 

Get Your Playa Wear Here

For San Francisco Burners, there are a couple of sales coming up this weekend featuring Playa-ready outfits. If you’ve never been to a Burning Man trunk show before, I highly recommend it. There’s a bar, DJs, and you can support the Burner ecosystem while getting decked out in the latest fashions.

jumpsuitsNIMBY in Oakland

8410 Amelia St

Saturday 10:00-17:00:

Are you still looking for that perfect Burning Man outfit? Well look no further and come visit the East Bay Burners at NIMBY on August 9th. We have faux fur, sparkly spandex, jewelry, funky shoes, glow in the dark T-shirts, unique crafts, swag, and the list goes on. Please come on by and pick something up and support your local burners as they continue to fundraise to bring their large scale art projects out to the playa.

We are also still accepting donations of costumes, crafts, treats for a bake sale, booze, volunteers to help out. Contact leorigill@gmail.com


And at Mighty in the city, a trunk show featuring more than 30 designers:


beyond the fence image8th Annual BEYOND THE FENCE Trunk Show!
Saturday, August 9th
@ Mighty – 119 Utah San Francisco
Noon – 6pm
Free Entry
https://www.facebook.com/events/658419364252890
Our trunk show highlights over 30 local independent designers showcasing designs for both on and off the playa. We are very excited to be bringing you some new designers and kick off the shopping season properly!

On the Decks:
Anthony Mansfield – Disco Knights
Joel Conway – Housepitality / Bubble
Wichita Ron – Disco Knights/Magnificent 7

BEYOND-THE-FENCE-2014-520x804The Designers:
10th Muse
Aya Papaya
AvaTailor
Blue Moon Designs
Dr. Cory
Dreamtime
Eghan Thompson
Firebird
Flow Toys
Gata Designs
Ghetto Goldilocks
Gita Salem
Griffin Wings
Gypsy Streetwear / Firefly Style
Hipstirr Belts
In Visions
Jan Hilmer & Sparrow
Kayo Animae
KrakenWhip
Malvoye Enterprises
Minerva’s Antennae
Miranda Caroligne
Nomadic Nectar
Om Gaia Tree
Opal Moon Designs
Phoenix Rising
Pretty Kitty
Renegade Couture
Sefirah Fierce Designs
Shawna Hoffman
Sheila B
SilverLucy Design
Skin on Skin Belts
SuperSugarRayRay
T.S. I LOVE YOU
Tamo Design
The Window Lady
Tooth Gem’s by Foxy
Warrior Within Designs

Cool Hunting Interviews Leo Villareal

leo and yvonneLeo Villareal is one of the founders of the Disorient major theme camp. He is also the first Burning Man artist to have an exhibition of their works at a major museum – in 2010, at the San Jose Museum of Art. The Disorient crew sure knows how to throw a party! Michael Slenske at Cool Hunting has just published a great interview with Leo, in which he talks about Burning Man and the Bay Lights – the largest electronic art installation in world history.

From Coolhunting.com:
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Two decades ago, New York-based light sculptor Leo Villareal attended Burning Man (the annual week-long art event in Black Rock City, Nevada, which culminates around a wooden sculpture of a man set on fire) and the experience changed his life. A few years later Villareal returned to the Nevada desert with a 16-strobe light beacon of his own design, which he fixed to the roof of his group’s RV so that they could find their way home. “I was tired of getting lost, so I made my first piece which was sort of just a utilitarian thing to help me stay oriented. But then I thought, ‘Wow, that’s a very powerful combination: software and light,’” recalls Villareal, who brought the work home to NYC, laid a translucent cover over the top and had just produced his first gallery-worthy light sculpture, “Strobe Matrix.”

Villareal spent the next 10 years broadening the scope of his work with increasingly larger, more technically complicated architectural interventions. Many were commissioned as temporary works, and many have ended up being permanent or semi-permanent. To wit: six years after it was installed, the 41,000 LED, three-years-in-the-making “Multiverse” still envelops the 200 foot-long walkway between the east and west buildings of the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC. The artist’s “Stars” remains in the windows of the Brooklyn Academy of Music years after it was scheduled for de-installation; the Buckminster Fuller-inspired “Buckyball” that lit up NYC’s Madison Square Park in 2012 is currently being shown outside Alice Walton’s Crystal Bridges Museum of Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, where it is now part of the institution’s permanent collection. The 25,000 algorithmically-controlled LED lights that make up “The Bay Lights,” which just marked its one-year anniversary, continues to illuminate the night sky across the Bay Area, and may continue to for another decade or so.

LeoVillarealCharged1.jpg

The latter—likely the most technologically challenging public art installation ever—is also the subject of a new documentary, “Impossible Light.” The film premiered at SXSW and details the project’s numerous challenges: raising $8 million in private funding over two years, overcoming epic industrial, national security and environmental concerns not to mention finding the right people to get behind the project (from local engineers to public art éminence grise Christo, who wrote letters of endorsement on Villareal’s behalf). On the heels of the film’s premiere and the installation’s anniversary, Villareal checked in from D.—where he was taking some time to absorb the ambient glow of “Multiverse”—to talk about his trajectory from Burner to Bay Area icon, what technology means to his work and what’s next.

LeoVillarealBayofLights2.jpg

So it was just the one-year anniversary of “The Bay Lights.”

Yeah, on 5 March.

If you look back at that strobe light piece you did for Burning Man, could you ever have imagined this kind of trajectory for your work?

Absolutely not. The first year I went to Burning Man was 1994, and I made the strobe piece in ’97. That got me going and then over time I did my first large-scale architectural piece in 2003 at MoMA PS1 in Long Island City, and it just went incrementally from there. But I never thought I’d do anything like “The Bay Lights.” It’s cool what you can do with light.

LeoVillarealDoubleScramble.jpg

Were you ever interested in the pioneers of California’s Light and Space movement? Was that something you were thinking about?

I had an art history background, and my family is from Marfa, Texas, so I certainly knew about Donald Judd and Dan Flavin and [James] Turrell. But I studied sculpture and then I got into technology in the early ’90s and I wasn’t quite sure how I was going to fuse all these new tools I was using into my art-making practice. That’s what happened in ’97 [with “Strobe Matrix”], and I realized this is very powerful and this is what I want to pursue. But I would say it was definitely a combination of the Light and Space guys, plus Burning Man, plus technology being in the right place at the right time over and over.

How has your work evolved as technology has advanced?

Certainly I would not be able to do the work I do without LED technology. Solid-state lighting is remarkable in its robustness and in how energy efficient it is. I’m also very involved in creating my own LED circuit boards and control systems and all the software I use is custom-written. I’m working with my programmers—I only go so deep myself—but at the end of the day I’m using the tools that have been custom-made for me, and then I’m very involved in the sequence-making. But I’m all for innovation and I wish it would go faster. I’m really excited for LEDs that last a million hours instead of just 100,000 hours.

LeoVillarealClimbing1.jpg

What’s your process like when creating public installations?

I’m there to capture that 1% of the time when something exciting happens and I can bring that back—something I’ve harvested—and then I can continue to layer and evolve it. It is a very painterly process, it’s very compositional, very similar to the way you’d compose music. There are certain motifs that repeat at different scales at different tempos. There’s background layers and foreground layers and layers that subtract light, so you’re dealing with negative space.

Since “The Bay Lights” went up, have you been inundated with projects of that scale?

It’s been unbelievable. We’ve had over half-a-billion media impressions and that was several months ago. The story went from local to national to international and it’s inspired huge amounts of interest in my work and for doing monumental public art. I think what’s exciting is that with “The Bay Lights,” it’s not only a piece of art 50 million people will see in two years, but it’s also good for the city. It’s bringing in, conservatively, $100 million to San Francisco in restaurants and hotels.

LeoVillarealCLimbing2.jpg

Are you involved in the campaign to keep “The Bay Lights” running through 2026?

Yes, we just announced that on 5 March. It’s really about the people of San Francisco. They’ve really fallen in love with the artwork and they want it to remain, which is great. But like I said in the film, this is something that needs to come from the public, not the artist saying, ‘My piece has to be permanent or here for [another] 10 years.’ I just feel honored to have had it up for this long. I’m okay with temporary art; that’s how it is on [Burning Man venue] the Playa, you have to let it come and go. But if something can become iconic and part of the city, of course I’m thrilled to participate in that.

When you walk through cities, do you see the possibilities in the architecture?

Definitely. Over the years my ability to create 3D simulations and visualizations has evolved, which is very important in my work and a lot of projects start like that: showing people what it could look like. That’s how “The Bay Lights” started, with a one-minute animation showing people what it could be.

Is there a new space you’d really love to explore?

I want to get out in nature. There’s some test pieces out in spaces in Texas. Places like Marfa, I think would be very exciting to explore. That’s going in a whole other direction.

LeoVillarealBuckeyProcess.jpg

Are there any new items on the tech front you’re thinking about the way you might have thought about LEDs years ago?

The control of LEDs used to be very, very expensive. Now you can buy this stuff on a roll from China and, for a couple hundred bucks, you can be sequencing LEDs, which was never possible before. I would like for there to be more really revolutionary innovations in light, but I still think there’s a lot left to do with LED.

What other new projects are you working on at the moment?

I’ve been focusing more on gallery shows and museums. I’m doing some different group shows, one called “The Light Show,” which is traveling to New Zealand and Australia. I’m currently in the Cartagena Biennial. We’re going to be showing “Buckyball” sometime this year; we’re making a scale model of it.

LeoVillarealBuckeyBall.jpg

So this is the indoor version of the outdoor work?

Yeah, it’s about a three-foot diameter sphere on the outside and then another sphere within that. I’m all about making smaller pieces and learning at different scales. I’m just really regrouping. Two-and-a-half years working on the Bay Lights was pretty consuming. I just moved studios and have a new studio out in Brooklyn in Industry City.MakerBot is out there.

Is the new studio helping out with the work?

I can think straight with having enough space. I was in the same studio for 15 years in Chelsea, right in the middle of the art world and that was great but it’s just a lot of noise. Going to a place where I can think and work is very important. That’s what the new studio is about. For me it’s really about assessing where I’m at and figuring out the next moves. But it’s definitely an exciting time.

“Buckyball” images courtesy of Leo Villareal Studio, “The Bay Lights” images and “Double Scramble” image courtesy of James Ewing, “Impossible Light” images courtesy of Jeremy Ambers