Cops Seize 36 Different Types of Drugs in Large Scale Operation at Aussie Regional

Screenshot 2017-10-01 13.04.59

The headline basically says it all. Re-blogged from Sydney’s Daily Telegraph (emphasis ours):

POLICE have charged 17 people with drug offences after an operation at Australia’s version of the Burning Man festival.

The large-scale long weekend police operation at the Burning Seed festival in the Matong Forest, near Wagga Wagga concludes tomorrow with police seizing a large number of drugs.

Sergeant Maggie Deall said there had been 40 drug detections and a total of 70 drug exhibits seized with additional police from Sydney helping in the operation.

“Some of those drug detections involve multiple drug possession matters,” she said.

“We have actually come across 36 different types of drugs; ranging from the party drugs that are fairly standard at these events.

Ecstasy, MDMA, cocaine, all the way through to magic mushrooms, cannabis, and prescribed restricted substances like buprenorphine…People are so laissez-faire about their drug use given that they’re so far from medical help, I think it’s a fairly risky behaviour to undertake,” Sergeant Deall said.

“You may have taken 100 different pills, 100 different times and nothing has happened.

“You never know what’s in them. The next one could be the pill that kills you.”

The festival is now in its seventh year…

Those charged are believed to be from Sydney, Melbourne, the Northern Territory and even Germany and all listed to appear in court over the next couple of weeks.

[Source: Daily Telegraph]

Emmy Mack at MusicFeeds has more details:

Police have wrapped up their first ever drug operation at Burning Seed festival — Australia’s version of Burning Man — charging 17 punters with drug offences.

Cops with sniffer dogs set up a roadblock at the entrance to the ‘deep space’ themed music festival, which is currently underway at ‘Red Earth City’ in the Matong Forest, west of Wagga Wagga, seizing “a large variety of drugs” including cannabis, mushrooms, cocaine and ketamine.

“Police are very concerned with the amount of drugs that people are trying to take into the festival and the danger to their health and safety,” Acting Inspector Maggie Deall from Wagga Wagga police station tells the ABC.

While a dude named Rodney, who volunteers as second-in-command on the festival’s front gate, argues that the majority of the event’s attendees were ex-hippies who aren’t even that into drugs.

“I’m 35 and I’m one of the younger ones there really,” he says. “It’s not a drug-fuelled music festival. You can lose yourself without having to get inebriated.”

Punters angry about the police presence at this year’s festival have flooded the Burning Seed Facebook page, calling for the event to be shunted interstate where drug detection isn’t as tough.

A man from Canberra — where the government has just given the green light to pill-testing measures — writes: “I advocate for not holding it in NSW or even VIC going forward given how both those State Governments are treating festivals of late like this, come to the ACT where we don’t go hard on those responsibly having a good time.”

Like Burning Man, Burning Seed culminates with the burning of a wooden temple and a 13-metre effigy.

The five-day festival is now in its seventh year, and is due to wrap up on Monday.

It comes after the tragic death of a man at this year’s flagship Burning Man event in Nevada, after he ran into the flaming effigy.

[Source]

A “punter” in Aussie parlance means a participant. It also means gambler, so perhaps they are suggesting that these 17 chose to try their chances against the sniffer dogs and came out on the losing side.

Here is a link to the discussion at Burning Seed’s Facebook page

A story on Triple J’s Hack.is being discussed at the Hack Facebook page.

Some photos from the Daily Advertiser:

[Source]

ACT, Australian Capital Territory, is not technically a State of Australia, it is a special district – like District of Columbia in Washington D.C., or Distrito Federal in Mexico City, or the City of London. Interesting that they are making a play now for the rave scene. It’s home to the nation’s capital city Canberra, where the politicians rule the country from. Canberra is a notorious hotbed of porn and prostitutes, another city laid out from a Masonic masterplan.

Maybe the Feds want to move Seed out closer to Pine Gap, all the better to keep the All-Seeing Eye of JORN on the trippers…

Cartoon by John Shakespeare, Sydney Morning Herald

 

Could be a Burning Man art installation…or could be Australia’s version of HAARP. JORN antenna array in Longreach, QLD

Is that White Ocean’s new camp setup?

Pine Gap is a great place for a party, as some lucky ravers in the year 2000 can attest

The Jindalee Operational Radar Network, a Lockheed Martin project

 

What Could Be: A Look At Australia’s Idiotic Lockout Laws

By Terry Gotham

For the Aussie Burners, this is going to be old news, but I wanted to take some time to explain what’s occurred across Australia, as it relates to the continued specter of clamp-downs, permit-driven events and the challenges cities like LA & NYC present to even the most seasoned producers. Lockout laws have eviscerated the once legendary Australian nightclub & dance music scene. After following the story for months and seeing a second Australian state engage in this idiocy last month, I couldn’t stay quiet anymore. New South Wales is one of the fronts in the war against drug checking, with pill testing being done at festivals, despite government bans or restrictions. The parallels between our fights provide opportunities for learning, while showcasing champions of harm reduction, like Alex Wodak, president of the Australian Drug Law Reform Foundation and business leaders willing to stand against the pearl clutchers.

Since 2010, lockout laws (laws forcing bars & clubs to stop serving alcohol and shut their doors early) have been enacted across Australia. In Sydney, a survey way back in January purported to find that 68% of NSW (the state Sydney is in) residents supported lock outs. This was interesting because a similar number (60%) also said they considered the city unsafe on a Saturday night. In the United States, in a lot of suburban areas, I bet you could probably find similar levels of support for Blue Laws (laws that prevent the sale of alcohol) and dry ( totally alcohol free) counties. In Baltimore, for example, last call is at 1:30, sometimes earlier, which ensures a lot of drunk people end up on the street, sometimes, before they’re ready to leave. The survey didn’t provide location data or any real information on demographics, only 353 people were polled, and it was sponsored by The Foundation for Alcohol Research & Education, an anti-alcohol advocacy organization, we can see who could be on the other side. There’s a healthy amount of fear-mongering going on, which is surprising, given that Sydney was voted the safest city in the world as recently as 2013, as referenced by their own Tourism page. Oh, and for anyone keeping score, dry counties in the USA have severe meth problems. But, enough about hyperbole and exaggerated claims. What’s actually happened in Sydney?

  • Introduction of 1:30a “lock-outs” (if you leave you can’t go back in) & 3a last drinks.
  • State-wide shuttering of liquor stores at 10p.
  • On-The-Spot Fines of up to $1,100 for disorderly conduct or disobeying a police officer.
  • Police allowed to impose “immediate” precinct ban of up to 48hrs to anyone they see fit.
  • Freeze on new liquor licenses (even if venues with existing licenses shut their doors)
  • A couple of good things, like free buses.

Over the last 4 years, King’s Cross, a storied region for bars, clubs & restaurants in Sydney has lost 84% of its foot traffic, forcing 40% of small nightlife based businesses in the region to close. Oxford Street, another thoroughfare, lost a similar 82% of foot traffic, with a commensurate drop in revenue. Venue after venue has closed their doors for the last time. This is salt in the wound to a nightlife market that saw a 60% drop from 2010-2012 when precursor regulations kicked in. The only institutions that are exempt from these laws are casinos, which is hilarious and terrible. If a casino is the only place you’re able to drink after a certain hour, how long before you decide to play some slots with the change from your late night snack? How long until you start going out on the weekends just to go to play blackjack? I think we can agree that Las Vegas casinos can be nice and all, but casinos at large can be exceptionally predatory, much more so than a live music venue or even a bar, that’s the reason why it is better to go to an online casino like www.PokieGuide.nz, it is so much better. And they do so, because it’s staggeringly profitable for them to do so.

The Star Entertainment Group, one of the larger gaming groups in Australia, has seen its share price more than double over the last 3 years, from $2.30 in December 2013, up to $5.74 as of July 18, 2016. This increased revenue comes not only from Casinos being open later, but being there to grab customers who are looking for places to go now that 40 of their favorite live music venues have closed. Additional revenue comes from relaxing restrictions on daily gambling limits for gamblers with a problem, which is about as gangster as you can get. While the UK is protecting venues, Australia might as well be burning them to the ground.

The pretext for these laws includes a campaign to raise awareness about “one punch” attacks, a rash of overhyped violence similar to the “Knockout Game” that occasionally pervades the news cycle here in the United States. Penalties for “random” or “drug and alcohol fueled” violence are varied across the country, but were implemented after a couple of high profile assaults had conservative forces attempting to crucify live music in punishment. These laws didn’t reduce the assault levels, but that didn’t stop sitting members of government from saying they did.

Matt Barrie, prominent businessman & founder at Freelancer.com has spent the last several months rigorously documenting how bad these laws are. His first article, “Would the last person in Sydney please turn out the lights?” was exhaustively researched and exceptionally well-received was the #1 read article on LinkedIn when it dropped in February. His second one, is even longer & more exhaustively researched. If you’re into this kind of policy wonk stuff, I encourage you to read both. They’re a master class in how to dismantle institutional bullshit.

A bad idea usually spreads, much to the chagrin of the Brisbane nightclub & live music scene and Queensland. NSW’s neighbor state approved similar laws, with them taking effect last week. After midnight, shots can’t be ordered, some venues will be forced to close at 2am, with “late-night” venues closing their doors at 3am. It looks as if they’re totally ignoring the protests that occurred in Sydney.

The party people in Sydney have been fighting back as hard as they can. Rallies, internet campaigns, celebrity advocacy & parties have occurred for months to try and get the changes reversed. Millionaire, venue & construction company owner Scott Hutchinson has gone on record to say he’d be willing to bankroll “whatever is necessary” to get the Queensland’s lockout laws back off the books. Even if he can’t get them removed across the country, a state-by-state fight could be successful if planned correctly. A motley crew of supporters in Queensland is attempting to help Scott, but right now, they need all the help they can get.

Mike Baird, the NSW premier is not popular. No seriously, like, 84% negative reactions to his posts supporting lock out laws and anti-event actions. He demanded festivals “do something” about deaths, then refused to allow pill testing & other forward thinking harm reduction measures, I’d say he’s earned the ire he’s getting. Maybe getting compared to Vladmir Putin by morning radio in NSW is a bit much, but when morning shock jocks are calling you a kleptocrat that’s out of touch with the people, you’re probably not doing everything right.

Interestingly, Victoria (another Aussie state) cancelled their own 2am lockouts year sago. Melbourne tried it, and it went hilariously badly. No seriously:

Independent audit firm KPMG found the Melbourne lockout led to an increase in reported assaults between midnight and 2am and also between 2am and 4am. There were also more ambulance trips due to assaults between 8pm and midnight, compared to the three months before the lockout. ~The Age, 2014

The demands from protesters who are fighting against them are almost mundane. Lifting of late night retail restrictions, late-night transportation (San Francisco, take note), ending the new license freeze for live music venues & small bars (to help get new businesses back in the area), and the creation of a Night Mayor, a city official that New York City desperately needs. This includes a creation of a 24hr area of the city, with late night work & play spots, and administrator of that space, called the Night Mayor. By smoothing relations between that region & the neighboring communities, this person can greatly affect the success of nightlife, and how the live music/bar/club community is viewed by the city at large. It’s such a good idea, there are now Night Mayors in Paris, Toulouse, Zurich & Amsterdam, with London and Berlin debating creating one.

So, what does this have to do with LA, San Francisco & New York City? Los Angeles flirted with banning electronic music events entirely this spring, with that measure being defeated despite the best efforts of a number of groups. New York City is all but devoid of outlaw events, with retail venue rentals regularly exceeding 5 digits in booking fees alone. Economic activity from electronic & live music events could be not only shared by many more producers that don’t have the cool $35,000 to throw a party with actual headliners, and communities wouldn’t have to hate renegade parties and Burns, if we can learn from Australia’s mistakes. Berlin, London, Munich & Amsterdam could teach major American cities a thing or two.

Not just about how to make small business thrive, but how to keep partiers safe, by deploying smart, tested harm reduction best practices. With people willing to go to jail to deploy these practices in Australia, perhaps the Mayors of San Francisco, Miami, LA & NYC can see the gift horse being presented to them. This could lead to a lot of money being made by non-party people. Capitalize on the surprisingly non-deflated live & electronic music markets in their respective cities, and test out harm reduction/security/law enforcement tactics that have been honed across both oceans,  If all of a sudden, this stuff works, and it’s easier, and safer to throw events in these cities, who knows, it might spread. It’s fun to dream.

(Thanks so much to Stoney Roads for their continuing coverage of this story & general dopeness when it comes to music choice and their give-no-fucks attitude.)

Keeping it Weird

candy van and gf

Australians. Can’t live with ’em, can’t send ’em any further away.

One enterprising young bloke from “the ass end of the world” has used his time in America and his trip to Burning Man to achieve international notoriety.

From the BBC:

In August 2015, children in a sleepy suburban neighbourhood of the Californian city of Sacramento noticed a white, windowless van parked on their street.

Across the side of the vehicle, someone had painted the words “Free Candy” in a bloody shade of red. A cluster of handprints were smeared nearby, suggesting that some candy-seekers may have come to the wrong kind of sticky ending.

A 12-year-old named Lawrence Bellow uploaded a photo that began to spread around the internet. Soon local news stations were interviewing local parents about the “suspicious van” rolling through town.

“It just felt like they were trying to attract kids, and it just gave me a creepy feeling,” Lawrence’s mum told the local KOVR TV station.

The van’s driver was Australian Ron Jacobs, 28, who had stopped overnight on his way to Burning Man, the month-long music festival in the middle of the Nevada desert.

By the time he arrived his van had already gained internet fame.

“I was just living in the van and I was just hearing it explode all around me,” Jacobs said. “I woke up one morning, some guy just screams out, ‘I saw you on the internet, I love your van!'”

Since then the “Free Candy Van”, which does actually give out free candy, hasn’t stopped getting attention.

Jacobs said the idea for the van came after his life in Perth fell apart “in a whole bunch of ways”.

“Life. Work. Family. The whole shebang,” he said. “All at the same time … I ended up picking up my savings and chasing my dreams.”

Those dreams involved a “big international adventure”, so he left to travel the American southwest and camp out while skydiving, windsurfing and attending music festivals.

Rather than live in a tent, Jacobs decided it would be better to buy a second-hand van, but knew he was trading comfort for the stigma associated with being a strange man in a white, windowless van.

Instead of shying away from the image, he decided to play up to it by going over the top.

“I was just kind of thinking, like most things in life that you can’t change … what you can do is embrace it and celebrate it,” Jacobs said.

Jacobs, an engineer who spent a year studying at Penn State University, has since given out $1500 (£1500) of free candy.

He said most of his interactions with other people involved a “rollercoaster” of reactions, starting with horror before moving to a sense of relief, and even delight.

Jacobs has been stopped by police eight times while driving the van. A friend from Perth who borrowed the van for three weeks was stopped seven times.

“I consider this van a mirror of American society,” Mr Jacobs said. “The whole experience I’ve had has just been me, a tourist, living American everyday life as their… public enemy number one, and it’s just been such an experience.

“It’s all just the epitome of absurd.”

free candy van

candy van ron jacobs

[Source: BBC]

Once again, over-protective and nervous parents found something to be over-protective and nervous about:

Here’s the Free Candy whistleblower explaining how he saved the day:

And here’s the perpetrator’s apology – in which he says that American society itself created the Free Candy Van (and its registered trademark and website):

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like the idea was original:

Parents, be sure to talk to your children about “stranger danger”.

This pundit cautions us to beware of all vans:

Australia’s Edith Cowan University, in Perth – the world’s most remote city – also did a story on one of their local fellas making a name for himself overseas.

The story behind America’s suspicious free candy van

A vintage van complete with blackened windows, no number plate and branded with ‘free candy’ in blood-red writing has been cruising around the streets of America giving out free candy.

It might sound the epitome of a parent’s nightmare, yet the menacing van contains nothing more harmless than a few extra trips to the dentist.  There are more important things to focus on, like fixing that grinding you hear from yuo kid’s rooms at night. Sollution: mouth guard for teeth grinding.

Perth hippy Ron Jacobs settled on the idea behind the van en-route to Burning Man festival this year; a stop before he headed off for three months of ‘wing suiting’, a sport where you fly wearing a suit that looks like an overgrown fruit bat.

Despite the media attention he received for the van, which wasn’t always positive, Ron assured sceptical onlookers that it was nothing more than a tribute to the Burning Man’s celebration of absurdism, and a product of his own unique humour.

“At the Burning Man it’s all about the giving, so what am I going to give?” he told ECU Daily.

“Oh and I’ve got to get to Burning Man. So I’ll need transport. I’ll also need somewhere to stay there … Okay, let’s connect all of these dots: FREE CANDY starts making a lot more sense.

“It’s just going to have to be completely over-the-top and really deliver on the promise of free candy at each and every opportunity.”

He said the  joy and delight I received driving others around, while handing out free sweets, was amazing.

“I get as many of my friends and their friends’ friends to drive around in it and give out free candy too,” he said.

“It’s such a blast. The sensation of being able to take someone from immediate shock-horror all the way through to gratitude and hilarity with a drizzle of irony in less than a second is outrageous fun in my book.”

The van made American news headlines, with some of the bold statements including: ‘Free Candy van creeps out parents in Sacramento’, and ‘Free Candy van upsets Sacramento residents’.

Luckily, these weren’t the only responses.

“I only ever heard the story from other peoples’ mouths,” Jacobs said.

“One interesting example was when one morning I woke up to a man shouting out at the top of his lungs at the van: “I saw you on the internet! F*** love your van!”.

So what’s next for the wing-suited, parent-creeping-out world traveller?

Best to keep in the loop via his Facebook page: facebook.com/ron.jacobs.146.

free candy night 1024x1024 free candy horse head 920x920

Radical Self Expression, Meet “No DickHeads”

2015 burning seed

Baron de Merxhausen just posted this on the Burning SEED Australia Facebook group. It’s interesting to see the Regionals struggling to get to grips with the Tin Principles That Are Just Guidelines, and very real issues like Consent and Decent Standards of Behavior to each other that don’t even appear in the principles. There were also some serious health concerns at this year’s event, which I will discuss at the end of the post.

 


by Baron de Merxhausen

I’ve noticed that the Radical Self-Expression principle has been getting a lot of air time, and as someone who likes to talk about anarchy, I thought I’d drop in my two cents about ideas of freedom and liberty and how they relate to RSE.

I’ll try to keep it as succinct as I can, but I’m a very flawed person so it will probably be very long and there may be some ranty bits. You might enjoy reading this if you ever find yourself wondering about what any of this hippy nonsense actually means.
* Feel free to interrogate any and all assertions made.

My feeling is that Burns tend to adopt a ‘liberal’ model of operation – people enjoy both positive liberties (I can fulfil my own potential aka freedom TO) and negative liberties (I won’t be interfered with aka freedom FROM). Liberties are like freedoms, except freedoms do not imply a limit, obligation or boundary while liberties acknowledge that we are social and therefore have to reconcile our obligations within a community. In other words, liberties have implied *potential* limitations. RSE would be positive liberty- the freedom to express yourself in whatever way you please. That it is a liberty and not a true freedom, the implication that it has boundaries remains.

Image: Nomakim Photography

Image: Nomakim Photography

There seems to be some tension where RSE is unclear on how much it is restrained by other people’s negative liberties – what exactly are we entitled to be free from? Which is another way of asking what non-interference actually means. How safe are we when people can express their inner psychopath?

There seems to be some consensus on consent being key, but where is the line drawn?
Consent was a really big focus this year, because consent is essentially about establishing where we are placing the boundary between what we don’t have to put up with and everything else.

There’s an added complication on this boundary when we take into account the tension between what is ‘offensive’ and what is ‘harmful’. That’s a really big discussion, and it varies from person to person, though for the sake of our community (principles 6+7) we need to try and do our best to make these lines consistent.

My personal feeling is that although there seems to be a strong call-out culture, emotional resilience is a trait we should try and cultivate so that the world isn’t quite as big and bad. I think many of you will agree that letting kids build cubbies and play in the dirt is a good thing for their development, despite it containing elements of risk. The same is true of our psychology; a little bit of muck, confrontation, repair and tolerance builds a versatile character.

So we have to ask ourselves when something is happening to/around us – is this thing *really* harming anyone? Is what I am doing going to hurt someone? We do these kinds of little calculations all the time, but there are times when we’ve got to dig a little deeper because of some nagging doubt, or someone shoots us a certain kind of look or gesture.

I do not subscribe to the position that a sense of a trigger alone is harm, and I think part of fulfilling our negative liberty is to allow others their space if we can see it’s not going to do any real or significant harm to ourselves or others, in which case our communal obligation might be to just walk away. With that said, I think the fundamental rule should be that if someone tells you to leave them alone, you should do just that.

This kind of discussion is especially relevant to issues such as ‘inappropriate’ jokes, cultural appropriation, et al. For example, a rape joke does not make you a rapist, they are seriously and qualitatively different things, and despite the cultural impact of such utterances (normalising, victim-blaming, etc) are bad, they are not in-and-of themselves particularly harmful. Does that mean the person should be treated like a rapist? No. Does that mean they’re good? No. Can you talk to them about it? Of course.

So in the context of a Burn, Radical Self Expression is there to try and say in a fun way, ‘do whatever the fuck you want so long as you don’t hurt anyone/thing**’.

This can be a double-edged sword because people have a fair degree of liberty to be dickheads within this framework. Of course this can be a bad thing, but it has a tendency to favour those who are positively expressing and cause those who are negatively expressing to both lose cred and see better examples. Compare this to the Meredith Music Festival’s model of ‘No Dickheads’, which, when someone is officially called out, will see them booted from the festival after a single warning. Not much opportunity for the kind of rehabilitative learning we’d like, but then, there’s also less dickheads (relative term).

I think the most experienced failure of RSE is where people aren’t (what others might think) just being jerks, but when they’re genuine creeps. That seems to me to be an intentional misinterpretation of RSE made by creepers, and why consent became such a big issue after last year’s Burn.

It’s a hard argument to make when your Expression, Gift or Effort harms someone, that it’s really coming from a positive place. We’ve heard stories of people given drugged food, without consent, and we’ve heard stories of people aggressively ‘sharing’ their personality with others-that did a lot more than offend someone.

In my view, Civic Responsibility is about acting on a considered and communicated negotiation between how we let people be their fullest selves and how we get together as a community to prevent ourselves from harm. This negotiation is an ongoing thing that changes along with the needs and desires of the community… but what do I really mean by this?

Is this is a Tree Wizard with a magical pied piper flute? Image: Nomakim Photography

Is this is a Tree Wizard with a magical pied piper flute? Image: Nomakim Photography

One of my serious peeves is with fucking *Tree Wizards*.
I apologise to those wonderful Tree Wizards out there for using this as my pejorative term for people (usually men) who espouse an esoteric way of life full of peace and love, but do little to critically analyse, engage with, or otherwise act upon the stuff they are talking about. Further, they act in ways that are fundamentally opposed to what they’re talking about.

In a vacuum, this problem of mine should be for me to grow up and deal with, but in my experience (and I’ve said this before) all the people I’ve met who’ve claimed to be gurus or shaman I’ve found to be not just charlatans, but genuine creeps.

There’s something both deluded and dangerous tied to the solipsistic belief that your word is the most profound around. It’s why they avoid any real critical evaluation within any proper or even basic philosophical or scientific framework – because it would expose them for what they really are: the hollow sophists and politicians of the hippy community, caught up in a massive ego trip, and using a few flowery tricks to snaffle sparkle ponies. It’s like the Game for Confest dudebros.

We allow these wolves-in-sheep’s clothing far more passes within our community because they don’t speak like, or look like, your serial Stereosonic fare, but my feeling is they are much more dangerous because they are insidious.

In my opinion, Civic Responsibility is helping both giving people tools to see if people are full of shit, and also responding appropriately to behaviour that is fucked.

What do you think that would look like?
If people can come up with responses, that is the community negotiating.

Soz for the long post.


Burners.Me:

Thanks to the Baron for that thought-provoking piece, and for giving us the term Tree Wizards. You can follow the discussion on Facebook, there are some great comments.

Burning Seed, one of two Australian official Regional events, opened this year with a deadly disease scare. Many people are reported sick after the event. Some attribute this to swimming in a dam, which apparently was prohibited in the Survival Guide. The organizers are emphasizing on Facebook that swimming in the dam is explicitly against the rules in their use of the property.

BMOrg, with their nearly three decades of experience in throwing events at remote locations, could offer a lot to their Regional Network in helping them deal with biohazard and consent issues. More established doofs in Australia like Rainbow Serpent and Earthcore don’t seem to have these problems, but they have little incentive to help an emerging competitor.

Screenshot 2015-10-11 11.48.09 Screenshot 2015-10-11 11.50.09

Screenshot 2015-10-11 11.52.27

moat interesting man burning seed

Downsize Your RV, Upsize Your Cool Factor

gidget beach

This is how we do it Down Under

Thanks to Burner SnowAngel for sending this in. Playa ready?

It may look small, but the Queen size bed fits a 6’6 person. The front slides out, the grill slides out, the fridge slides out, it even has solar panels.

Find out more at thegidget.com.au. If anyone brings one of these to a Burn please send us a photo.

Gidget-Teardrop-Trailergidget grill gidget out gidget closed